EarthCorps noxious weed training teaches practical skills and combats knotweed at the same time

EarthCorps crew members with safety gear on stand near backpack sprayers ready for noxious weed control training.

EarthCorps crew members geared up and ready for noxious weed control training.

On a sunny day in Snoqualmie with Mount Si in the background, 40 EarthCorps crew members donned their safety gear and got hands-on training in noxious weed control from the King County Noxious Weed Control Program. This enthusiastic group of students represented an impressive range of continents (5), countries (11) and states (10), and were very active learners, asking questions of each of the speakers throughout the day.

EarthCorps members in a classroom learning about noxious weeds

Classroom training for EarthCorps members included identification, laws, and IPM methods for noxious weeds.

In the morning classroom session, held in the City of Snoqualmie Council Chambers, instructors from the noxious weed program reviewed the state noxious weed laws, weed lists, identification and control of selected noxious weeds using the Integrated Pest Management (IPM), sprayer calibration, and pesticide record keeping.

EarthCorps member mixing herbicides and filling a backpack sprayer as part of noxious weed control training

EarthCorps member gets experience in safe handling and mixing of herbicides before trying her hand at knotweed control.

Then, heading outside for the afternoon, the EarthCorps crew members practiced safely handling, mixing and applying herbicide to the remnants of a stand of invasive knotweed.

Noxious weed specialist and knotweed control pro Sayward Glise teaches EarthCorps members how to use and maintain knotweed injectors.

Noxious weed specialist and knotweed control pro Sayward Glise teaches EarthCorps members how to use knotweed stem injectors.

Instructors gave practical demonstrations about how to calibrate and maintain knotweed injectors (watch a video to learn how it’s done). Triple rinsing equipment and careful record keeping concluded a beautiful day of learning in the field. WSDA recertification credits were offered to state licensed pesticide applicators upon completion of the training.

This training was provided to support the work and mission of EarthCorps. For more information about this awesome organization, see the EarthCorps website. Here is an excerpt: EarthCorps works to ensure that people and nature can thrive together. Their mission is to build a global community of leaders through local environmental service. EarthCorps brings together passionate and hardworking young adults from the US and countries around the world, for a yearlong leadership training program in Seattle, Washington. EarthCorps is a 501c3 non-profit located in Seattle, Washington.

Justin Brooks, riparian noxious weed team lead for the Snoqualmie River, teaches EarthCorps members about controlling invasive knotweed.

Justin Brooks, riparian noxious weed team lead for the Snoqualmie River, teaches EarthCorps members about controlling invasive knotweed.

The noxious weed program instructors for the training included Tricia MacLaren, Federal and State Lands Coordinator, and the program’s Riparian Noxious Weed Team leads: Justin Brooks, Sayward Glise, Randy Ladowski and Erin Haley. Thanks to the City of Snoqualmie for the use of the Council Chambers and for permission to treat the knotweed on their property.

To request a noxious weed training for your organization or community group, contact the noxious weed program’s education lead. Upcoming noxious weed classes that are open to the public are posted on the class schedule page.



Categories: Classes, Program News, Weed Control

Tags: , , , , , , ,

2 replies

  1. What herbicide was used?

    • That’s a good question. For knotweed control there are only two systemic herbicides that we have found effective on killing enough root to be useful. In this training I’m not sure which one was used but we typically use aquatic formulations of either glyphosate or imazapyr on knotweed. Email us at noxious.weeds@kingcounty.gov and we can give you more information on knotweed control. Thanks for your question!

%d bloggers like this: